Jump to Content

Resources

Videos

These videos illustrate different aspects of the search for MH370. You may use this material under a creative commons license. That license allows you to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt this publication provided that you attribute the work.

 

Drift analysis undertaken by the CSIRO. This material supports that the debris from MH370 may be found as far west of the search area as La Réunion Island and is consistent with the currently defined Search area.

Blue, black and red dots simulate items with leeway factors (applied to the 10m wind velocity) of 1.2, 1.5 and 1.8%. The items originated along the black arc (7th arc) on 8 March 2014. White arrows are the winds for the day shown. Magenta symbols are positions of real drifting buoys (with sea-anchors at 12m) on the day. Their movement has been used to estimate the errors of the ocean current component of the total drift velocity.

Source: ATSB, simulation and video by CSIRO.


 

GO Phoenix experiences rough sea conditions in the southern Indian Ocean. The two blue shipping containers on the deck serve as portable workspaces, in which members of the search team conduct towfish operations and maintenance.

Source: Hydrospheric Solutions Inc., video by Ryan Galloway & Joshua Phillips.


 

Fugro Discovery encounters rough conditions in the Southern Indian Ocean as the search for MH370 continues through the winter months.

Source: ATSB, video by Mike Williams.


 

Fugro Discovery encounters rough conditions in the Southern Indian Ocean as the search for MH370 continues through the winter months.

Source: ATSB, video by Mike Williams.

 


 

An interview with Kristian Lynch of Fugro. He describes his work as the geophysicist aboard Fugro Discovery, processing the raw data obtained by the 'Dragon Prince' towfish into a usable form and sending to the Fugro offices in Perth. There, the material is reviewed and interpreted by experts.

Source: ATSB, video by ABIS Chris Beerens, RAN.

 


 

A short film describing the processes of bathymetric mapping and side scan sonar, used to gather data within the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Source: Geoscience Australia

 


 

Aboard Fugro Discovery, Dylan Lynch of EdgeTech, describes the sonar systems that are being used to search for MH370 and the way in which they are tested. Mr Lynch is a sonar specialist.

Source: ATSB, video by ABIS Chris Beerens, RAN.

 


 

Aboard Fugro Discovery, Andy Sherrell of Sherrell Ocean Services, describes the preparations for the search for MH370 and some of the challenges that the searchers face. Mr Sherrell is the ATSB’s Quality Assurance Manager for the Search for MH370.

Source: ATSB, video by ABIS Chris Beerens, RAN

 


 

 

Footage of ‘Dragon Prince’, the EdgeTech DT-1 towfish that is being used on Fugro Discovery to search the seafloor for MH370. In this film, Dragon Prince is launched for the first time by Fugro crewmembers as they test its capabilities.

Source: ATSB, video by ABIS Chris Beerens, RAN.

 


 

Geoscience Australia is providing extensive advice, expertise and support to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB). The ATSB is leading a seabed mapping and underwater search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370 in the southern Indian Ocean.

Bathymetry is the study and mapping of the sea floor. It involves obtaining measurements of the depth of the ocean and is equivalent to mapping on land. Before the underwater search for MH370 could begin, it was necessary to accurately map the sea floor to ensure that the search is undertaken safely and effectively. Bathymetry survey vessels spent months at sea, scanning the sea floor with multibeam sonar to gather detailed, high-resolution data. The data has revealed many seabed features for the first time. This computer-animated ‘flythrough’ shows a visualisation of some of the sea floor terrain in the search area.

Source: Geoscience Australia


 

The conditions in the search area are challenging and extremely variable. As well as being quite cold, the surface of the ocean will vary from smooth to very rough with high seas and waves that are many meters high. The wind is also very changeable and unpredictable. In this video taken on board the Fugro Equator, you can experience conditions around a sea state 7.

Source: ATSB, video by Fugro


 

Footage taken off the stern of the Fugro Equator as it conducts bathymetric survey operations in the southern Indian Ocean. The bathymetric survey will produce a map that charts the contours, depths and composition of the ocean floor, in preparation for the underwater search for missing aircraft MH370.

Source: ATSB, video by Fugro


 

Bathymetry is the study and mapping of seafloor topography. It involves obtaining measurements of the depth of the ocean and is equivalent to mapping topography on land.  The bathymetric survey will produce a map that charts the contours, depths and hardness of the ocean floor. The video above is not the result of the MH370 survey, but demonstrates the type of information and detail that is being gathered.

Source: Geoscience Australia


 

Related: MH370
 
Share this page Comment
Last update 06 August 2015