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Aviation legend donates historic propeller

Australian aviation legend Peter Lloyd AC OBE MID today donated the propeller from a Supermarine Walrus aircraft to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood accepted the donation on behalf of the ATSB, saying it was a significant piece of Australian aviation history.

ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood accepted the donation on behalf of the ATSB

“The Supermarine Walrus was a British single-engine amphibious biplane reconnaissance aircraft first flown in 1933,” Mr Hood said.

“It was operated by the Fleet Air Arm and also served with the Royal Air Force (RAF), Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) and Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF).

“It was the first British squadron-service aircraft to incorporate in one airframe a fully retractable main undercarriage, completely enclosed crew accommodation and all-metal fuselage.

Designed for use as a fleet spotter to be catapult launched from cruisers or battleships, the Walrus was later employed in a variety of other roles, most notably as a rescue aircraft for downed aircrew. It continued in service throughout the Second World War.”

Mr Hood said Peter Lloyd was a champion of aviation safety nationally and internationally for more than a half a century.

“He has made an indelible contribution to aviation safety through his position as President Emeritus and Life Member of Safeskies Australia,” Mr Hood said.

“I’d to thank Peter for his frank and fearless advice to myself and to successive Ministers and Governments on many occasions, and for his generosity in donating this significant piece of Australian aviation history.”

 The Supermarine Walrus was a British single-engine amphibious biplane reconnaissance aircraft first flown in 1933

About Peter Lloyd

George Alfred or “Peter” Lloyd as he has become known, was born in Sydney in 1920, and attended Sydney Church of England Grammar School, and then the University of Sydney.

On 31 May 1940, Peter enlisted in the Second Australian Imperial Force and served throughout the Second World War. He was assigned to the 2/6th Field Regiment and saw action in the Middle East and New Guinea. On 8 March 1945, Peter was Mentioned in Dispatches for gallant and distinguished service in the South-West Pacific.

On his return to Australia, he worked as a grazier and in 1951 was elected treasurer of the Royal Aero Club of New South Wales. He qualified as a pilot in 1955.

In 1957, he became president of the club, a position he held for 10 years, and then again from 1972 to 1974. He built up the club from poor condition to the largest aviation school in the British Commonwealth.

In 1958, Peter became president of the Federation of Australian Aero Clubs, and set about greatly increasing the federation's membership and promoting aviation sports throughout Australia.

Honors

In 1964, Peter was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) as president of the Royal Aero Club of New South Wales.

In 1969, he received the Oswald Watt Gold Medal—Australia's highest aviation award. The late Sir  Charles Kingsford Smith won this medal three times.

In 1987 Peter worked personally with Mikhail Gorbachev, the last president of the former USSR, and President Ronald Reagan of the USA and other world leaders to free a teenage German flyer, held after illegally flying to Moscow.

In 1989 he was presented with the FAI Gold Air Medal, the world’s highest and most prestigious civil aviation award. Only two other Australian's have received this honour — Bert Hinkler and Sir Donald Anderson.

Peter was also honoured by the USSR with the Yuri Gargarin Award for services to air sports internationally, aeronautics, cosmonautics, and the cause of world peace.

Peter still devotes extraordinary time and energy as President Emeritus of Safeskies, Australia's international Air Safety Conference.

In the 1990 Australia Day Honors, Peter was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for service to aviation and international relations. In 1992, he was inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame.

In the 2016 Queen's Birthday Honors, Peter was upgraded to a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), for eminent service to the aviation industry, particularly to the advancement of air safety in Australia, through leading roles with national and international aeronautical organizations, and airport associations.

He has nearly 11,000 hours of flying experience on general aviation and aerobatic aircraft and experience in gliding, parachuting and ballooning.

He is Patron of the Australian and International Parachute Federation and conducted parachute jumps over Canberra on his 80th, 85th, 90th and 95th birthdays.

 
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Last update 10 August 2017