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Summary

Summary

The pilot was flying parachute operations from Bridgewater airstrip where there were two grass strips, an 1100 metre east west strip and a 700 metre north south strip. Occupants in a house to the west, off the end of the east west strip, were holding a function and had requested in writing that the parachute aircraft avoid overflying for the day to prevent the nuisance of noise. The pilot decided to comply with the fly neighbourly request and use the shorter north south strip. After all four parachutists had exited at 3,500 ft the pilot joined for a tight right circuit for a landing to the north. Although he was high and fast on final he persisted with the approach in an effort to avoid wasting valuable flight time. At the time, the wind was estimated to be a southerly at about 5 knots, the grass was wet and the aircraft was light. With full flap and airspeed about 10 knots higher than desirable, the aircraft touched down hard well into the strip. For a moment the pilot considered a go-around but quickly rejected the idea for fear of colliding with marked powerlines immediately north of the strip beside a road. He braked hard but there was little affect due to wet slippery grass. He attempted a ground loop but to no avail. The aircraft overran the strip, crashed through a farm fence, passed under the powerline, crossed a sealed road, penetrated another fence and came to rest about 40 metres beyond the airfield boundary. During the overrun the nosewheel assembly collapsed and the propeller struck the ground. The operator advised that there was no pressure on the pilot to hurry. The pilot gave the impression that he was so keen to please that he inadvertently placed himself in a situation beyond his level of flying ability.
 
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