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Summary

Summary

The pilot was tasked with spreading urea on dry rice crops. He took off to the south in calm conditions. At an altitude of about 30 ft in the initial climb, he commenced a left procedural turn while continuing to climb at 70 kts to approximately 100 to 150 ft. The pilot then noticed that the airspeed had decayed to about 60 kts so he lowered the nose. Airspeed continued to decay so he stopped the turn while heading northwest and lowered the nose to increase airspeed. The aircraft continued to sink and touched down in a ploughed paddock. The pilot maintained climb power during the ground roll, hoping that the aircraft would takeoff again. After a ground roll of 300 to 400 metres through the ploughed paddock, the aircraft collided with a low earthern embankment and overturned. No fault with the engine or airframe has been reported to have contributed to the accident. The pilot admitted that the inflight turns were somewhat tight. It is probable that the aircraft stalled causing it to mush to the ground. It is also probable that the drag effects of the ploughed soil prevented the aircraft from accelerating enough to become airborne. Significant Factors The following factors are considered relevant to the development of the accident: 1. The pilot probably allowed the airspeed to decay during a tight procedural turn. 2. The pilot did not attempt to stop the aircraft in the ploughed paddock. 3. The pilot did not select full power for the attempted takeoff from the ploughed paddock.
 
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