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Summary

Summary

Prior to departure the pilot rang the owner of the airstrip to get information on the strip and permission to land. He was told that there were powerlines on approach to the 180 degree strip and the 090 degree strip. He overflew the airfield on arrival and noted there was a light easterly breeze so decided to land on the 090 degree strip which has a published length of 910 metres in the AOPA directory. The strip also has a displaced threshold which the pilot observed. On final approach he noted that the strip seemed short. The strip surface was grass and the pilot thought it may have been wet. He therefore slowed the aircraft and selected full flap while keeping power on, aiming to touch down as close as possible to the displaced threshold markings. Approaching the end of the strip the pilot believed he must have been past the powerline although he had not actually seen it. He lowered the nose to touch down on the displaced threshold and at that point hit the powerline. The aircraft then hit the ground heavily, sustaining substantial damage. During the investigation the owner of the airstrip advised that the strip was 900 metres fence to fence. Landing into the east there was 680 metres available due to the displaced threshold at the approach end. After the accident the pilot said he noted that the powerline was in fact over the "turning area" at the approach end of the strip and the poles were some distance apart, remote from the final approach path. The day after the accident the electricity supplier installed marker devices on the powerline. Significant Factors The following factors were considered relevant to the development of the accident: 1. The pilot was warned about the presence of a powerline on the approach end of the strip he was using but did not ensure that he sighted it prior to making his landing approach. 2. Although he had not sighted the powerline, on short final approach he made an assumption that he must have passed it and so lowered the nose to touch down as close as possible to the displaced threshold markers. 3. The pilot "dragged the aircraft in with power" on a low final approach profile instead of flying a normal glidepath. 4. The powerline was not fitted with any warning marker devices.
 
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