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Summary

Summary

The pilot was taking off to the west from a 620 metre agricultural airstrip with a load of 420 kilograms of urea. The strip was level and the grass was short. The wind was from the west-north-west at about 5 knots. The pilot used 15 degrees of flap for the takeoff. The engine produced full power. During the takeoff roll initial acceleration seemed normal but then it stagnated. The pilot began dumping the load at about two thirds of the way down the strip. At about 55 to 60 knots indicated airspeed the aircraft became airborne and was about one foot off the ground when it struck a fence. After the accident it was discovered that there was about 200 kilograms of urea still in the hopper despite the dump valve being open. Soon after the accident the company chief pilot inspected the airstrip and discovered that the surface was deceptive. It looked reasonably firm but had been affected by recent very heavy rains. In his opinion the surface would have retarded the takeoff performance about the same as long wet grass. He also believed that the pilot was slow in dumping the load. The Class 2 agricultural pilot was operating under indirect supervision at the time of the accident. This accident was not the subject of a formal on scene investigation.

 
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