Jump to Content
Download Final Report
[ Download PDF: 22KB]
 
 
 

On arrival at the destination, the pilot selected the landing gear down. Almost immediately afterwards, the radio frequency indicators faded, and a strong burning smell became evident. The pilot carried out a go-around, during which radio communications were lost and the burning smell became stronger. The pilot attempted to lower the gear with the emergency system, but found he was unable to move the manual extension handle. Under the circumstances, he elected to land as soon as possible. The aircraft touched down on the runway with the gear partially extended, and slid for about 200 metres before coming to rest. It was determined that the aircraft battery was almost completely discharged, but no other defect was found in the electrical system. It was possible that the pilot had not turned on the alternators before commencing the flight. When he selected the landing gear down, the gear motor had been subjected to excessive heat, and it had subsequently seized. The overheating was probably the result of high current draw under conditions of low battery capacity, causing reduced gear motor rpm. Because the motor and the emergency extension handle are on a common shaft, the pilot was unable to lower the gear manually.

Download Final Report
[ Download PDF: 22KB]
 
 
 
 
General details
Date: 29 November 1986 Investigation status: Completed 
Time: 1017 Investigation type: Occurrence Investigation 
Location:Canberra Occurrence type:Wheels up landing 
State: Australian Capital Territory Occurrence class: Operational 
Release date: 04 September 1987 Occurrence category: Accident 
Report status: Final Highest injury level: None 
 
Aircraft details
Aircraft manufacturer: Beech Aircraft Corp 
Aircraft model: 58 
Aircraft registration: VH-PGQ 
Type of operation: Private 
Damage to aircraft: Substantial 
Departure point:Bankstown NSW
Departure time:927
Destination:Canberra ACT
 
 
 
Share this page Provide feedback on this investigation
Last update 13 May 2014