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Summary

Summary

The aircraft departed from Port Pirie after refuelling in the course of a flight from Coober Pedy to Parafield. The pilot had not lodged a flight plan and there is no evidence that he consulted a weather forecast. The aircraft carried only VHF radio. Following advice from a friend of the pilot that the aircraft had not arrived at Parafield an air search was commenced and the wreckage of the aircraft was sighted late that afternoon at a position 3 miles west of the direct track Port Pirie - Dublin. The aircraft had struck the ground heading west and with the nose and right wing slightly down consistent with the aircraft having been under control. The engine was delivering substantial power at the time of impact. Weather over the route south of Port Pirie was influenced by a strong westerly wind and there were winds of up to 35 knots. The Hummock and Barunga Ranges had been enveloped in low cloud and drizzle throughout the morning and there are reports that the cloud cover extended to a considerable height in the area of the ranges and across the track which the aircraft might be expected to follow. A number of aircraft were seen and heard in the area during the period in which the accident occurred but it has not been possible to establish the precise flight path of this aircraft.
 
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