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Take no chances when landing

  • A go-around is a standard manoeuvre when a pilot is not completely satisfied that the requirements are in place for a safe landing.
  • The sooner a condition that warrants a go-around is recognised, the safer the manoeuvre will be.
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A hard landing of a Cessna P206B at Monduran in Queensland is a reminder for pilots to conduct a go-around as soon as landing conditions appear unfavourable. 

On 29 September 2012, the aircraft departed Gympie on a private flight to Monduran, carrying the pilot and four passengers. During the landing at Monduran, the pilot noted the windsock was indicating gusty wind conditions but still decided to land.

A go-around is a standard manoeuvre when a pilot is not completely satisfied that the requirements are in place for a safe landing.

During the landing, at about 10 feet above the runway, the Cessna was struck by a significant wind gust. The aircraft bounced and the pilot applied a small amount of power in an attempt to regain control. The aircraft was then struck by a second, more intense, wind gust before stalling and touching down hard on the nose landing gear. The pilot maintained control and the aircraft came to a stop.

Although no one was injured in the incident, the aircraft’s propeller, nose landing gear, and lower engine cowls were damaged.

The ATSB recommends pilots conduct a go-around as soon as landing conditions appear unfavourable. A go-around is a standard manoeuvre when a pilot is not completely satisfied that the requirements are in place for a safe landing.

The need for a go-around may occur at any stage during the approach and landing. However, the most critical go-around is one initiated very close to the ground. Consequently, the sooner a condition that warrants a go-around is recognised, the safer the manoeuvre will be.

Read the investigation report, AO-2012-135.

 
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Last update 14 January 2013